How God Sees

by Matt Borja

The eyes of the LORD are in every place, beholding the evil and the good.

I often struggle with underappreciation.

You invest your entire being into a given duty or task and come off the field with nothing left to give. And for a brief moment, there is an internal satisfaction and pride that you did your utmost best. What more could you ask for? What more could anyone ask for?

But then the smile fades to disappointment as you look around for your support system to cheer you on, or welcome you home; and they're not there. Or the email thread that was active just moments ago has now gone cold. Or the person on the other end of that screen has stopped replying to your "instant" messages altogether. Or your inordinate number of followers simply aren't tracking with what you're saying and your mind-blowing ideas and clever sayings, well, simply weren't "Like-worthy" enough to go viral; but rather attracted a new wave of hate-filled trolls. The gratification is not so "instant" anymore, is it?

Ah, therein lies the heart issue: whether we like to admit it or not, we want to be worshipped; and thus we concern ourselves and thus we consume ourselves with whatever it takes to attract and secure the praise of men.

This brings to mind many of the chief rulers who believed on Jesus in John 12 but would not confess him, lest they should be put out of the synagogue: for they loved the praise of men more than the praise of God.

Even to those who would follow, Jesus warned, The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head. And when he was come into his own country, he taught them in their synagogue, insomuch that they were astonished, and said, Whence hath this man this wisdom, and these mighty works 
Is not this the carpenter's son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas? And his sisters, are they not all with us? Whence then hath this man all these things? And they were offended in him. But Jesus said unto them, A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country, and in his own house. And he did not many mighty works there because of their unbelief.

The least we could say is that Jesus also suffered not just perceived, but actual underappreciation. They, like many today, witnessed that he possessed an extraterrestrial measure of wisdom, that he healed their sick and raised their dead, that he cast out devils, and that he had an even greater gospel message concerning his resurrection by which they would be set free; but still glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened.

The least we could say is that Jesus also suffered not just perceived, but actual underappreciation. They, like many today, witnessed that he possessed an extraterrestrial measure of wisdom, that he healed their sick and raised their dead, that he cast out devils, and that he had an even greater gospel message concerning his resurrection by which they could be set free if they would simply receive him; but instead they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened.

Well said Esaias the prophet:

Who hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the LORD revealed? For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him. He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth. He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare his generation? for he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was he stricken. And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth.

Something that also stood out to me just now is the image of how overwhelmed Jesus must have been, under the combined weight of both abandonment and undeserved punishment, in pure isolation from the rest of the world: as told in verse 6, how we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all; and how he was wounded for our transgressions, bruised for our iniquities; how the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.

Don't you think by now Jesus knows exactly what underappreciation (and more) is like? To give your life for people who end up turning their backs on you, or worse, turning on you?

Lord, to whom shall we go? thou hast the words of eternal life.

So whatever it is you might be going through today—I certainly wouldn't have the slightest clue—just know that God sees what you're going through.

How does God see?

Look up.

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